Creating the Perfect Private Library

Libraries have always been a timeless space open for unique design. Whether the library is modern or historical, small or large, or used for reading or working, the library is possibly one of the rooms that invites the most creativity in its architecture and design.

Mansion Global interviewed Jeffrey Forrest, the founder of STACKLAB, a design studio based in Toronto, Canada, to ask about his advice in designing libraries.

“Your library is a record of who you are,” Forrest told Mansion Global. “Design decisions should be deliberate and very personal — with equal focus on celebrating your history, but also on the joy of reading.”

With that being said, here are a few tips on designing the perfect private library.

Photo courtesy of Binyan by IF STUDIO

Photo courtesy of Selwyn Tungol

Using your space

For book-lovers who need an ample amount of shelving space, floor-to-ceiling bookshelves are functional and add a great design to the walls of the room. When all the books are placed on the shelves, it creates a beautiful assortment and makes the walls burst with color from top to bottom. Whether it’s designed with a more modern or classical touch, the floor-to-ceiling bookshelves are sure to be the centerpiece of the room. 

The double-height library located in the lobby of 277 Fifth Avenue in New York City utilizes this concept, creating a beautiful centerpiece for all visitors and residents to see and use.

Bold Colors and Fabrics

Feel free to bring vibrant colors out from the shelves and into the room through the furniture, curtains, walls or rugs. Whether you’re going for a more modern or historical design, bold colors can create a more interesting and unique space. In Washington, D.C., the Jefferson hosts a book room sure to attract book-lovers from all over. Its velvet green couch adds the perfect pop of color, creating the perfect balance in the space between neutral and vibrant colors. 

The bold colors can be used not only in historical designs, but in modern designs as well. Adding a statement rug or sofa can bring a room’s colors together.

Photo courtesy of The Jefferson

1000M, Photo courtesy of Miller Hare

Laying it Out

A library is the perfect opportunity for designers to get creative with the layout of the space they have. Whether the center of the room is a desk, four chairs around a coffee table or an assortment of seating, there are endless possibilities for the designer to create the perfect space to fit the needs of the homeowner. At 1000M, the layout is comfortable yet elegant, with ample seating for readers to use.

If the option for multiple levels is available, create a unique look by adding a spiral staircase to get from one level to the other or ladders on the shelves for the reader to grab whatever book they’d like. Make sure, however, that whatever the layout is, there is plenty of comfort for the reader to use the space often. Adding comfortable seating and plush rugs can do just the trick for this.

Whether designing the space or simply looking for inspiration, libraries are arguably one of the best rooms to have the most creativity in its design. So remember — regardless of what look or layout, make sure to use this unique opportunity!

Lauren Behfarin saw a need for sophisticated design geared toward growing families.

Arriving home from the hospital with your newborn for the first time, rocking your infant child back to sleep, reading a book with your talkative toddler — a nursery will become the setting for endless, lasting memories as your child grows.

From falling in love with their first smile to cheering along their first steps, parents will inevitability spend many heartwarming hours in their child’s nursery — which means the space should bring joy to both parents and children for years to come.

Designing the perfect nursery may seem intimidating, but luckily this interior designer understands the importance of creating a space filled with love, care and joy.

Five years ago, Lauren Behfarin designed her daughter’s nursery in preparation for her first child’s arrival. She quickly discovered a gap in family-friendly design, and created Lauren Behfarin Design. “Once I had a family, I wanted to do more work geared toward children and younger families,” says Behfarin, who previously worked for Drew McGukin Interiors.

With a growing clientele, the trendy NYC-based interior design firm now designs spaces for new parents and growing families that are vibrant and sophisticated yet comfortable and livable. Understanding the emotion and love that goes into each space created for a child, Behfarin has found that “nurseries and children’s spaces often become an extension of a home.”

Although she designs a range of spaces, Behfarin’s favorite projects are always nurseries for first-time parents. “Nurseries are always so fun, and so full of hope, life and excitement. It is such a special time to watch new mothers experience pregnancy and for parents to experience a baby for the first time. We are always honored when families include us in that time,” says Behfarin, who works alongside her associate, Abby Gruman.

As a parent of two, Behfarin values convenience and function. After designing a nursery, first-time parents may soon realize that a makeover is required less than two years later. In order to keep the transition as simple as possible, Behfarin tries to “anticipate the next steps of a child’s life” with her designs.

Using various patterns, textures and bold colors, the team is sure to incorporate fun elements that feel young while also considering the next five or 10 years of a child’s life. “As I experience these phases with my own children, I am really learning what works and what does not work long-term in a space. We are learning what elements transition with your child and which do not,” Behfarin says.

Born and raised in Manhattan, Behfarin also understands the need for storage in a compact apartment. Utilizing items such as cribs that turn into toddler beds or bunk beds that double as two twins beds, Behfarin “makes sure that clients have the best items for their children to grow.”

Whether it’s furniture that won’t cause injuries to a newborn or toys that won’t grow tiresome, first-time parents often look to Behfarin and her team for more than simple design tips.

“They’re looking for great design, but they are also looking for advice. We take relationships to heart when we have clients who are experiencing this for the first time,” Behfarin says. “I am here to guide, push and challenge clients, but I always deliver something that they love.” 

How to Design the Perfect Nursery

Accent Walls — “There is always an accent wall, whether it’s a really cool decal, cool paint color or interesting wallpaper,” Behfarin says. “There should always be a fun backdrop to one of the walls in a nursery, and it’s usually the one with the crib.”

Minimal Themes — Cautious to not take a theme too far, Behfarin always suggests incorporating components from a theme, such as accent pieces or different colors. “There are ways to bring in a theme that are not too thematic,” she notes.

Neutral Colors — “There has been a shift toward gender neutral colors, such as grays, creams and whites,” Behfarin says. “People are prioritizing style. The standard pink and baby blue are not popular right now, and I think it is because style, form and function are so big in the city right now.”

Acrylics — This year, Behfarin is seeing a lot acrylics. “Homeowners are loving acrylic cribs with acrylic bars, or chairs with acrylic legs,” she explains. “Acrylic accents have shown up a more recently, I think as way to make a nursery modern.”

Organized Spaces — Whether it is a bunk bed with shelves, a coffee table with compartments or an ottoman with storage inside, Behfarin appreciates and understands the fluidity of space. “Homeowners are constantly reimagining how their space is being used,” she explains. “The hustle and bustle of the city has caused us to pay attention to creative and innovate ways to save space.”

Photo courtesy Niio.

Smart technologies and artificial intelligence are changing the way we consume art.

While many treasured works of art are safely contained in notable museums or in the homes of experienced collectors, a new tide is cresting along the shores of the art curation field with the influx of digital art.

Digital art, more widely known as new media art, is an interesting sector of the art industry to define, even for Beryl Graham, who is a professor in New Media Art at the University of Sunderland. She notes that the roots of this art form have drawn inspiration from a range of movements, from conceptual artwork to video art, which also began in the 1960s.

“It’s broadly digital but [it’s also] the kind of art that works in different ways in different kinds of behaviors,” Graham notes. One fascinating example would be an exhibition of software art in which the software, sometimes even artificial intelligence-based artwork, can learn and grow on its own. Graham explains that an artist might start a piece of software and watch it evolve, perhaps give it a virus and watch, showing to the audience that the “end point isn’t quite under the control of the artist.”

Magdalena “Magda” Sawon, owner of the contemporary art gallery Postmasters Gallery in New York, says that the digital age has only heightened the senses of curators and artists, who are traditionally at the forefront of new developments in culture and technology.

“Technology is a tool,” she notes, “it is also a moving target and changing constantly. The question is to be aware of new developments and adapt it intelligently to one’s needs and benefit.” Fittingly, as artists have been harnessing the power of technology within the art industry, curators and galleries have had to “keep up with the times,” and embrace digital forms of artwork and the systems and methods in which they are displayed.

 

Donna Holford-Lovell, director of The North East of North festival (NEoN), notes how the incorporation of interaction and participation into art displays appeals to today’s technology-savvy audiences that have been gradually reinvigorating focus on the digital art world.

“The idea of ‘curation’ has become ubiquitous and our audience is seen to be curating many aspects of their own lives,” Holford-Lovell says. NEoN is an organized event that aims to advance the understanding and accessibility of digital and technology-driven art forms by having the artist and curator work together to translate “the spectacle of experience,” via digital platforms within physical spaces, like virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and even social media.

JONATHAN MONAGHAN (US)

The Phoenix and the Medusa (2018), Video, 7 min 69 sec, Edition of 30, Niio Commission Series.

With systems and platforms, from artificial intelligence to online-based forums, both artists and curators now are developing larger platforms and databases to contribute toward. As well as an educator, Graham is co-founder and editor of the Curatorial Resource for Upstart Media Bliss, or CRUMB, a resource for curators of new media art that aims to help overcome any challenges presented from this rise in digital art, from installations to networks of artists and individuals versed in these practices.

PERRY HOBERMAN

Suspensions (2018), VR and mixed reality installation, Postmasters April 2018.

QUAYOLA (UK)

Camouflage (2018), Moving Image, 6 min 4 sec, Edition of 30, Niio Commission Series

On the luxury spectrum of art curation, Niio is a brand integrating digital art and technology-driven forms of collection and distribution that surges past the limitations of traditional artwork. Niio is an art and tech company aimed to enable the exposure of digital artwork in a time that to the company feels like a fourth industrial revolution.

“Art has always reflected the world we live in,” says Rob Anders, CEO and co-founder of Niio, “and artists will create their art with any tool they can access.” In today’s world, that tool has come to be technology. Anders, who understands the eclectic background of digital art from conceptual and video art, wanted to help designers and architects best fit homes with the art of today, and after speaking with top galleries he found that what’s really needed are new models of both the business and technological side that reach a broader audience — even better: one with a subscription.

 

“We envision a world where in homes people will have more digital canvases with interactive or immersive works, all on a centralized connected system that can very easily change,” Anders says, with access to top artists in the world in this ecosystem of artists, galleries and collections all on the Niio platform. Luckily, the CEO notes, the technology is “already there,” from artificial intelligence in devices like Amazon’s Alexa devices to smart televisions, all devices that can easily work with the Niio platform to display digital artwork.

To those interested in having access to the “world’s finest art accessible on-demand,” Niio is open as a limited edition membership at about $5,000 a month, with access to curated exhibitions and collections, or art “playlists” of over 7,500 art pieces on the platform that can be easily changed and displayed on devices like smart TVs, projectors, screens, et cetera, which can be installed by Niio technicians as well.

“Art curation is telling a particular story,” he says. “In order to give people these digital works, it’s not about just finding the individual works, it’s about giving people the ability to learn about the works they are looking at,” he says.
Rob Anders

CEO, Co-Founder, Niio

New York designer Aimée Wilder explores Eudaimonia, a Greek word commonly translated as happiness or “human flourishing,” in her collection of wallpapers, fabrics, rug and accessories. From the effects of the moon on the evolution of the natural world to the impact of astrological phenomenon, Wilder captures the many ways surroundings can influence our psychological state, and contribute to overall wellness.

“This collection was born through finding balance and stability in my own life,” says Wilder. “Once I learned that living to work instead of working to live, along with incorporating methods like Vedic meditation and natural healing into my daily routine, was able to create a peaceful environment around me, I hoped to thoughtfully reflect that feeling in each design.”

Eudaimonia consists of two wallpaper and fabric patterns, Pyramide du Soleil and Earthlight, with an additional rug pattern, Eclipse. All three patterns reflect the natural balance between the Earth, the Sun, and the Moon, evoking the beauty of cosmic balance. With this collection, Wilder introduces a new construction for commercial fabrics, tested for 50,000 double rubs and available with a range of protective coatings including anti-microbial and stain coating. In addition, for the first time, Wilder will offer wallpaper printed in Brooklyn, New York, where she resides and operates her design studio.

Pyramide du Soleil is a subtly optical pattern manifesting the ancient Sun’s shadow and its balance with the earth, Pyramide du Soleil features pyramid and Sun as they represent the illusive quality of time. It integrates pyramids and circles with sophisticated diagonals and horizontal stripes, inspired by the continuous synchronicity that exists between the earth and the Moon.

Earthlight focuses on the waxing and waning cycles of the Moon’s phases in an eye-catching, geometric pattern across wallpaper and fabric design. Named for the scientific phenomenon in which sunlight reflected from Earth’s surface indirectly illuminates the otherwise dark side of the Moon, Earthlight is sure to brighten any space.

Eclipse showcases the inversion of colors in this rug design suggests the effects of an Eclipse, a harbinger of change in the daily life that acts as a guiding hand when questioning one’s path. With a boldness that invokes a new take on a vintage aesthetic, the Eclipse rug comes in a range of warm tones that will add a welcoming touch to a room.

Pyramide du Soleil

Photos courtesy Aimee Wilder.

Eclipse

Photo by ©Dylan Chandler 2018.

Earthlight

Photos courtesy Aimee Wilder.

The powder room used to be an afterthought, but for people who entertain this space has become an important design moment. In fact, when it comes to luxury condo buildings, developers are now going above and beyond to create distinct powder rooms that leave a lasting impression – with details like custom wall paneling, unique custom lighting and specially made marble vanities that highlight today’s style trends. To perfect your own powder room, we’ve come up with a few tips based on stylish New York residences.

Embrace the Selfie Lighting

 

Often small spaces, powder rooms can still offer a great place to capture that perfect Instagram photo, especially if there is good lighting. To create the perfect selfie space, lighting must be on point to not only adequately brighten up the space, as well as both capture the best pose and highlight the style and decor of the room. 

350 West 71st Street

Photo by Alan Hill / Redundant Pixel.

There is some flexibility in this regard. For example, this chic powder room located in one of the residences at 350 West 71st Street offers flawless, bright lighting, making it the perfect spot to apply makeup.

 

Soft light, however, offers some of the best places to take photos. A great example is seen at 555 West End Avenue, where the mellow glow of the lit mirror highlight the powder room’s luxurious features, from the custom Calacatta gold countertops to the Lefroy Brooks fixtures.

 

With this lighting choice, you achieve a warm, inviting aesthetic that people will spend trying their best to capture.

555 West End Avenue

Photo by Hayes Davidson.

Keeping Fashion-Forward

Staying on trend can sometimes be difficult when it comes to home design, so the best way to do so is highlight classic, elegant finishes that remain stylish over time, while incorporating accents and decor that is on trend. Some classic finishes are beautiful marble counters and sinks, black and white tiles or wallpaper, and metallic detailing.

One Waterline Square

Photo by Noe & Associates with The Boundary.

Designed by celebrated architect, Robert A.M. Stern, 30 Park Place offers 157 residences, all managed by Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts.

Within the powder rooms of Penthouse 78B, marble vanities offer a minimalistic yet beautiful setting with its clean lines and silver accents, both elegant and modern. 

The Champalimaud-designed powder rooms at One Waterline Square are jewel-box-like spaces fashioned in striking black and white marble.

Every bit as luxurious as the master baths, the sparkling powder rooms feature best-in-class materials and fixtures, including polished Bianco Dolomiti marble flooring, polished Nero Marquina marble vanities and feature walls, Dornbracht fittings, and more.

30 Park Place

Photo by 30 Park Place.

Customization is Key

 

No matter your style, custom finishes or accents are also a defining decor element that can make or break the style of your powder room. Detailed design elements and customized, select finishes make a strong modern statement, create warmth and elegance in every space. Not only will these be a unique focal point, but inspirational in design for those looking to spruce up their own spaces.

Greenwich West

Photo by Alan Tansey.

Located at 110 Charlton Street, Greenwich Wests interiors have been beautifully designed by star Parisian architect and interior designer Sebastien Segers, who is known for his work with clients such as Giorgio Armani, Christian Dior and more.

A standout within, the powder rooms at Greenwich West are outfitted in Zebrino marble with custom-designed curved vanities featuring Laufen toilets and Hansgrohe Axor Bouroullec collection fittings in polished nickel.

A contrast of black and white, Segers’ signature ogee edge shape makes this a statement room.

Custom designing everything in the 61 light filled residences at 40 Bleecker in NoHo, the powder rooms leave no detail unturned.

Within the powder rooms, hand-selected statuary marble envelops the area and a unique lighting design by Bill Schwinghammer.

40 Bleeker

Photo by Bjorn Wallender.

Nature has been inspiration to designers and artists since the dawn of design, from floral prints and handcrafted wood pieces to architectural choices meant to showcase natural light. While these pieces aren’t dependent on natural light, their design and function are inspired by nature and its ever-evolving beauty.

In-es.artdesign

Italian artist and designer Oçilunam founded In-es.artdesign in 2003, to achieve their goal of combining art and design is an art in itself. The lamps from the brand’s Out Collection, through a design that encompasses nuances and varied sensations, create the ideal atmosphere for outdoor dinners, or to enjoy relaxation under the sun or starry sky. After dark you will be able to illuminate the garden or the terrace with a variety of shapes and colors, adaptable to any type of space.

Photo courtesy In-es.artdesign.

Photo courtesy HolzDesignPur.

Le KLINT

Traditional Danish company LE KLINT is known for its design lamps. Taking into account new trends and technologies, the LE KLINT luminaires are a symbol of modern Danish design, without neglecting the integrity of the company founded in 1943. In addition to folded lampshades made of paper and plastic, LE KLINT’s latest CARRONADE series will also feature aluminum luminaires with wood in elegant industrial design.

The Nordic design luminaires from LE KLINT receive their industrial charm primarily through the mix of natural materials like aluminum and wood: while the lampshades are made of aluminum, the bracket consists of light oak or dark walnut wood. Laterally set discs of gold-colored brass or silver aluminum round off the design of the CARRONADE lights in style.

For the CARRONADE series, the young Danish designer Markus Johansson was inspired by 18th century ship cannons, which is evident both in the form and in the material selection of the luminaries. All CARRONADE luminaires are also individually adjustable and can therefore be easily adapted to the respective room situation.

“I conclude that design, for me, has to be a perfect combination of function and form, which conveys emotions, that subtly affects us as humans, while simultaneously, enhances our daily experiences,” says Johansson.

The combination of the individual CARRONADE luminaires results in modern lighting concepts. While the CARRONADE pendant luminaires in different sizes illuminate, for example, the dining room table, the floor lamps CARRONADE low and high create atmospheric light conditions in the living room.

Fritz Fryer

With Summer now upon us and gardens in bloom, Fritz Fryer offers the Gorsley Pendant light, a copper rose pendant shade handmade exclusively for Fritz Fryer by a local artist and blacksmith.

Using two sheets of copper, the form is made by hand and is then worked on to create the depth of color that copper can achieve, creating the unique, floral design of the Gorsley. It can add a different dimension sitting above a dining table, or over a breakfast bar; it can be clustered, hanging at different drops for impact; or hang it above a bedside table for a feminine touch.

Beautifully organic in shape; the Gorsley is not only a gorgeous looking light but a piece of art in its own right.

Photo courtesy Fritz Fryer Lighting.

When it comes to maximalist design, more is definitely more, and walls are no exception. We’re not going back to the retro chintz of bygone eras, instead, current wallpaper patterns are bold, edgy, fun and available in huge variety.

Oversized tropical leaves, prancing golden zebras, floral prints in a neon palette, animal prints, geometric shapes… even world maps designed to fit whole walls.

They’re becoming huge works of art within a room with many wallpaper designs taking inspiration from famous artists — Van Gogh, Matisse, Andy Warhol to name a few. Wallpaper designs are refusing to fade into the background.

So how are home designers putting the trend into practice? Bold wallpaper creates a huge impact so it tends to be the starting point for a room design. One or two statement walls is often enough. They’re striking without being overpowering.

Dark colors, big patterns, embracing the bold wallpaper trend requires bravery, but the courageous are able to create unique rooms full of life and edgy charm.

wallsauce.com

This striking mural wallpaper, designed by Anna Jacobs from her original painting in ink on watercolour paper, is imagined as a super large scale art work to give maximum impact in an interior. It can also be hung in repeat, used with picture rails and dado rails and cropped to fit most wall heights, without compromising the image.

Photo courtesy of Anna Jacobs

This grand Jungle Paradise Wallpaper by Santorus features ascending vines of imperial creatures amongst ferns and palms. A soft gold-metallic finish enhances the stunning imagery to set a scene of embellished colonial nostalgia.

Photo courtesy of Lime Lace

Designed by Aurélie Mathigot, this blue and green wallpaper displays a soothing design. The wallpaper is entitled “De L’autre Cote le Calme,” which translates to “The Other Side of Calm.”  If you’re in search of escape, wide open spaces, and extensive greenery, this beautiful wallpaper will bring this breath of fresh air.

Photo courtesy of KSL LIVING

This paper creates a tromp l’oeil effect — appearing as three-dimensional images but on a flat surface. The designer sourced the images of old wood from surfaces in his own workshop in Eindhoven. This is a part of a new collection of six designs by Piet Hein Eek, black marble, white marble, black brick wall, silver brick wall, burnt wood and blue painted wooden floorboards.

Photo courtesy of Lagoon

Often serving as the focal point of a living area, a fireplace can take a room from ordinary to extraordinary.

Whether it’s a fireplace that hangs from the sky or a fireplace with multi-colored LED lights, European Home has compiled research to form the definitive ‘what’s hot’ list of luxe outdoor modern fireplaces for the summer of 2019.

This is what’s trending in modern outdoor fireplace design.

Fire that hangs from the sky. For example, the suspended Ergofocus by Focus Fires combines the humble backyard fire pit with the high art of the sculpture garden at MoMA. This fireplace even rotates so you can enjoy every square foot of your outdoor living space.

Ergofocus by Focus Fires
Image courtesy of Focus Fires

Paxfocus by Focus Fires
Image courtesy of Focus Fires

A linear fireplace with a twist (or a corner rather). The J Series: Corner outdoor fireplace can dramatically draw attention to the architecture of your outdoor living space with its unique wraparound corner design.

 Industrial textures. This wall-mounted outdoor fireplace features a rusted, corten steel finish which is the perfect textural accompaniment to an industrial or minimalist outdoor living space.

The architectural fire pit. At actress Courteney Cox’s Malibu home, custom seating becomes an extension of the patio and surrounds a teak and steel gas fire pit.

Custom Architectural Fire Pit. Photo by Simon Upton
Image originally published by Elle Decor

Color + Illumination. The JM2 outdoor fireplace offers the ability to illuminate the interior of your fireplace with multi-colored LED lights so you can create a tantalizing outdoor ambiance with or without the flames.

The fireplace is the epitome of luxury, and many other brands are also creating innovative fireplaces. Here are only a few:

napoleonfireplaces.com

modusfireplaces.com

flarefireplaces.com

In a recent Furniture Choice survey of adults in Great Britain, minimalism has emerged as a favorite summer interior design trend, beating out other decorating styles like maximalism, jungle and tropical.

Rebecca Snowden, Interior Style Advisor at Furniture Choice, shared three tips to achieve the minimalist trend at home.

Keep surfaces clean and clutter-free

Based on the philosophy that less is more, minimalism is an intentional mode of living centered around simplicity. When aiming for this look at home, Snowden recommends to focus on clean lines and clutter-free spaces.

“Start by decluttering ruthlessly – eliminate anything that’s unnecessary and store belongings out of sight,” she notes. “In the living area where multiple activities take place regularly, make it a habit to clear surfaces daily. Keep a sofa feeling cozy with a couple of cushions and tidy up the coffee table for a clean look that feels relaxing at the same time.”

Other ways to reduce a cluttered look is to keep wall décor to a minimum, opting for pieces that are simple and streamlined. “A few pieces of framed artwork can add personality to the room and make it feel lived-in while staying on-trend,” Snowden says.

 

Stick to a neutral color base

At the heart of minimalist styling is a neutral color palette — subtle hues of white, grey, taupe and similar earth tones are calming and make a space feel fresh and clean. According to Snowden, the easiest way to add style to a minimalist home is to choose essential furniture pieces that contrast beautifully while keeping within the neutral colour spectrum.

“A white table with a sleek chrome finish lends a striking, modern touch and blends seamlessly into the overall look,” she adds, “If tight on space, get a round table with a pedestal base. Otherwise, larger spaces can opt for an extending table that’s practical and space-saving. Elevate the look with chrome-legged dining chairs that play up clean lines with a high back.”

Another way to make a minimalist home come to life is to place indoor plants within the space. “Greenery is often what turns a house into a home, and when it comes to this trend, plants can add warmth like no other. Keep it simple with a couple of potted greens or hang some air varieties that function as air-purifiers, as a bonus,” Snowden says.

 

Furnish and decorate with simple, clean silhouettes

The best way to furnish your minimalistic space is to focus on decorative pieces that are purposeful, such as a knitted throw for dipping temperatures or a minimal lamp for reading. As for centerpieces, a cushy sofa with a clean silhouette oozes comfort and makes a space feel inviting.

“Minimalist living is perfect for those who revel in clutter-free environments and enjoy interior design with a purpose. Display one or two treasured items instead of multiple small objects, and always pick pieces intentionally,” says Snowden. “Rugs are a good one luxurious yet unfussy, and they double up to section off areas for different functions, while photos bring a sense of homeliness.”

Ultimately, Snowden notes being a minimalist doesn’t mean stripping all personality away “it simply means that what does get displayed is thoughtfully curated and means a lot.”

All photos courtesy Furniture Choice Ltd.

Natural stone unites with modern metals in the new Eccentric Stone collection by Australian kitchen and bathware design manufacturer Rogerseller.

 

A celebration of the beauty in balance when two become one, Eccentric Stone is a new collection sculpted from natural stone and highlighted by hints of metal. In perfect harmony, these signature elements explore the power of duality; the raw and refined, subtle and strong, timeless and modern.

Presented in Carrara marble or Emperador Grey stone, the collection features new round and oval basin designs, a shelf and the acclaimed Eccentric Mixer.

“Curved lines and generous proportions add an understated luxury to the pieces, while the refined shapes and considered details continue to demonstrate the craftsmanship Rogerseller is revered for” says Jo Jackson, group manager of

Designed to be paired with Rogerseller’s signature Natural Elements finishes, each piece incorporates metallic hints, making this stone and metal duo truly unique. The metal finishes drawn from the Natural Elements collection include Chrome, Brushed Chrome, Satin Chrome, Graphite, Brushed Nickel, Bright Nickel, Twilight, Matt Black, Bright Gold and Brushed Gold, creating styles defined by the individual.

Finding inspiration from the Earth’s raw resources and the untouched qualities that come from years of metamorphosis, the Eccentric Stone collection shows the result of a “whole made greater by the sum of its parts,” according to the brand. “While individually, the elements of stone and metals are well-known and loved, brought together they create a new harmony, making for an unstoppable duo.”

All photos courtesy Rogerseller.

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